Running For Fallen Soldiers | Human Race | Runner’s World

Running For Fallen Soldiers | Human Race | Runner’s World


(calm music) – I’ve got to have a rhyme or reason why I’m doing something, some kind of long term goal. We say their names because as heroes, not only do they die, but they’ll die again, if nobody ever says their name again. Sergeant Raymond Morakowksi Junior, August 28th, 2016. And I found a reason to run again, and it’s running for these fallen heroes, and these gold star families. It’s the only reason why I run, that’s what drives me. (calm music) My dad was in the military, all of his brothers were in the military, and all their kids were in the military. And it’s almost like you don’t want to break the string. – This is Chris’s other son, think he’s in Kabul. – Yeah. He was in Kabul and he just got back right before Thanksgiving. – There’s Ryan, that’s when he was in Afghanistan. – [Chris] Second tour. – [Chris’ wife] Second time, yep. – [Chris] I joined the military, for one out of respect for my dad, but I felt it was a duty. When I was in the military , we ran all the time. So when I got out of the military, my thoughts were, I’m never running ever again. Last year, 2019, we had the first annual Kentucky Run for the fallen. One thing that it probably set heavy in my heart is how come we’re only honoring these fallen heroes and their gold star families two days out of the year? We have 363 days. So as I was running one day, I ran past this tree, and this tree is incredible. It looks like something out of a movie, and then I thought, I could bring soldiers in here and set up like this little monument. And it’s hard to get to, it’s four miles there, and four miles back, so it’s a total of eight miles. I come up with that idea, and I found a reason to run again. I found these soldiers at a Consumer Mall, right down the street. It’s just, you just don’t go into Walmart now and buy little green plastic soldiers. They don’t sale them, so I had to do a little search for em. I have access to a database of all the fallen heroes from the state of Kentucky. So, I had the names, date of death, where they’re from. This is my database. This is all the ones in red, I’ve already ran for, the ones that are still white I still gotta run. The two or three days a week that I do run, I run em all consecutively in a row, because there is something to be said, to take the misery level even a little higher, when you get into ultra-running, it’s going to pay off dividends mentally. (calm music) Today we’re going to carry that hat. (trunk closing) (footsteps) (calm music) These soldiers, a lot of em are really special to me. We say their names because as heroes, not only do they die, but they’ll die again, if nobody says their name again. Petty Officer, Second Class, Aaron J Teet, March 11th, 2001. Specialist, David W. Taylor, March 29th, 2012. And Sergeant, Michael C. Cable, March 27th, 2013. Over half of these fallen heroes were victims of suicide. It’s terrible. We gotta do more. (calm music) I need to find, where’s my limit? The 32 mile, or the 50 mile or, the 100k. I don’t know. I don’t where that’s gonna be. Maybe a hundred miler next year, I don’t know. We’re gonna find out though. Unless you push yourself, you do not know how far you can go. That’s where you feel alive.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *